The Old Farmers Almanac 2020 Now Available


By Carla Charter

Those wondering what next year’s winter weather will hold may want to pick up a copy of the 228th edition of the Old Farmer’s Almanac which is now available at retailers, Amazon, and almanac.com

The Almanac is predicting a wet and wild winter “very similar to last winter. It will be more wet than white with temperatures milder than normal. That does not mean warm, it just means not as cold as expected. There will be above normal precipitation making it more wet with a near normal amount of snowfall.” according to Sarah Perrault, Senior Editor at The Old Farmer’s Almanac.  Other forecast trends in the almanac include those focusing on popular foods, gardening, farming and pet trends.

The Almanac is so much more than the weather though.  It includes information valuable to gardeners, amateur astronomers, cooks and those who just want to get back to a simpler way of life.  This year’s recipe contest winners, along with their recipes are in the almanac with the first prize recipe for Spinach Artichoke Dip Stuffed Pasta Shells.  Next year’s recipe contest information, which offers first, second and third prizes is also in the almanac with the category being appetizers. This year’s edition also includes articles on the history of horse shoes, how to make your own pain relievers with items from your kitchen cabinets, and an article entitled Sound, a History of Noise, Perrault continued.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac is the oldest currently published periodical in North America.  “The farmer on the cover is the founder of the almanac, Robert B. Thomas, an amateur astronomer, and as a farmer someone who was connected to the earth and it’s natural cycles in general. He took the knowledge he had acquired over the years and developed a formula for his predictions. He put out his first farmers almanac in 1792 when Washington was president. That year he sold about 3,000 copies and sold them at .09 cents per copy. His predictions were so spot on that during the following years he put out three times as many and the rest is history.  Today we produce 3 million copies of the old Farmers Almanac yearly,” Perrault said.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac produces a children’s version of their almanac as well which includes articles on food, astronomy, gardening and weather. “It is 192 pages of full color with no advertising. We say it is for kids and kids at heart because although kids love it, parents and grandparents seem to love it too,“ Perrault said.